Monday, May 25, 2020

The Fire Next Time By James Baldwin - 869 Words

Between the world and me† is basically a letter Coates writes to his 15-year old son, Samori. The style and structure of the book borrows largely from â€Å"The Fire Next Time† by James Baldwin which has an epistolary structure and an elliptical style. At a glance, the texts seems like they were not meant for the general public as the tone of book insinuates privacy and intimacy. However, this is not the case. As a matter of fact the appearance of privacy is deceptive and he uses the letter form to give him a larger scope to illustrate the emotional complexity of black life in America. Some parts of the text portray characteristics of a faithful letter while some indicate that Coates is speaking to larger audience. One of the moment which shows that it is a personal letter is revealed after the non-indictment of Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown as Coates addresses his son one on one: â€Å"†¦You stayed up till 11 pm that night, waiting for the announcem ent of an indictment, and when instead it was announced that there was none you said, â€Å"I’ve got to go,† and you went into your room, and I heard you crying. I came in five minutes after, and I didn’t hug you, and I didn’t comfort you, because I thought it would be wrong to comfort you. I did not tell you that it would be okay, because I have never believed it would be okay...† In another moment, he appears to be speaking to the general public and rallying his black counterparts against black supremacy: â€Å"†¦Perhaps our triumphsShow MoreRelatedThe Fire Next Time By James Baldwin851 Words   |  4 Pageswants to be â€Å"just another one† and playing by someone else’s rules. In the three works â€Å"The Fire Next Time†, A james Baldwin photograph, and â€Å"Para Teresa† i found evidence of marginality and assimilation for all different kinds of worldwide issues toda. I’ll explain. In James Baldwin’s â€Å"The Fire Next Time† there were many examples of assimilation and marginality. For example, in this work Baldwin writes â€Å"Also I knew that once I entered the house, I couldn t smoke or drink, and I felt guiltyRead MoreThe Fire Next Time By James Baldwin1493 Words   |  6 PagesIn James Baldwin’s collection of essays, The Fire Next Time, he discusses a range of topics stemming from the ultimate point that despite current implications and present maltreatment of African Americans in America, White Americans are not the only ones who contribute to the inferiority of Blacks. It is a collective action problem that has to be realized on both sides of this issue. In order for the nation to move on as a whole and get somewhere past this, Blacks and Whites have to work togetherRead MoreThe Fire Next Time By James Baldwin906 Words   |  4 Pagesconfines of the United States especially. James Baldwin, author of The Fire Next Time, writes of his experiences and thoughts of racism throughout his life in the previously mentioned book. Though published in 1962, Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time greatly relates to the U.S even to this day. Baldwin shows a different side of racism that one might have never thought—while keeping a sense of hope for the future intact. In the first essay dedicated to his nephew, Baldwin says, â€Å"[†¦] and we can make America whatRead MoreThe Fire Next Time By James Baldwin1394 Words   |  6 PagesThe Fire Next Time and its political message â€Å"The country is celebrating one hundred years of freedom one hundred years too soon.† (Baldwin, 10) The Fire Next Time, written by James Baldwin in 1963 brings up the segregation in mid-20th century America with emphasis on the impact of history and politics. Although Baldwin’s main focus was not politics it is nonetheless an important aspect of the racial segregation because it was how the laws were interpreted that constituted the crime. Even thoughRead MoreThe Fire Next Time By James Baldwin Essay1875 Words   |  8 PagesIn the book, The Fire Next Time James Baldwin the author and narrator of the book writes about his childhood growing up in Harlem and what he witnessed and learned as he grew up. When Baldwin was fourteen he saw Harlem in a completely different way. He saw that the terrible influence of the streets were slowly trying to creep up to him and take him over. The people around him helped with these influences like his father who told him that he wa s heading down that road as well just like his friendsRead MoreAnalysis Of The Fire Next Time By James Baldwin848 Words   |  4 Pagesthis nation since the arrival of the Spanish Conquistadors. The Fire Next Time, written by James Baldwin, is an account of this historic issue during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, a collection of peaceful protests and boycotting of public transportation systems to combat racial segregation and achieve equal rights for all. In this testament to the cruelty suffered by the African American population during this crusade, Baldwin illustrates the domestic cataclysm wrought upon his people byRead MoreEssay about The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin735 Words   |  3 PagesThe Fire Next Time by James Baldwin James Baldwins book The fire Next Time opens up an entirely new world to most readers. It opens the reader to the harsh world of a black boy growing into a man in the poor city slums and all of the issues that a black man has to face. This book does more for the reader than any article published about the blacks living in the poor cities in terms of exposure for the reader. The reason why it hasRead MoreJames Baldwin s The Fire Next Time1840 Words   |  8 PagesTa-Nehisi Coates’ epistolary Between the World and Me has become a literary symbol for the â€Å"Black Lives Matter† movement. Structurally, Between the World and Me is a direct descendant of James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time; both texts were written as letters to male heirs and released at pivotal moments in Black social movements. Coates’ work draws upon the literary legacies of the Richard Wright School of urban realism and the Black Arts Movement. Between the World and Me promotes a slightly moreRead MoreAnalysis Of James Baldwin s The Fire Next Time 901 Words   |  4 PagesThe history of America was followed by awful times involving slavery, racial segregation and inequality of African Americans living in the United States. During this atrocious time period, many African Americans had hope in their lives of America being entitled as one united nation i gnoring the color of skin. James Baldwin was one of many important figures during the Black Arts Movement (1960s -1970s). He wrote many influential essays and poems that impacted many people’s views on the history andRead MoreAnalysis Of James Baldwin s The Fire Next Time 1919 Words   |  8 PagesThe Fire Next Time, James Baldwin’s (1963) two autobiographical essays, a compelling precursor to many of the components of the Civil Rights movement, with resounding motifs of power/politics, religion/morality, racial injustice, and freedom. Baldwin lived in Europe for a number of years and felt compelled to return to America to get involved in the Civil Rights movement (James Baldwin Biography - life, children, name, school, son, old, information, born, movie, time, n.d.). The Fire Next Time

Friday, May 15, 2020

The Chilean Mining Rescue Essay - 1406 Words

The experiences that I have had throughout the class have definitely helped me to grow as a person and shape my perspective effectively. There were tough moments during the GRC and even with class discussions. There was a lot to learn. Speaking of the Chilean mining rescue (Chilean mining rescue, 2012) was always an aspect of a course that gave me a good example of how to manage diversity in groups. Firstly, the concept of subjective boundaries are boundaries that are psychological in nature, they provide an understanding of who belongs in a group and who does not (McCollom, 1995). This concept has made me reflect on, psychological obstacles that affect me personally in both my personal and professional life. For example, during certain group sessions in class, I felt as though I could see how these boundaries can inhibit collaboration. The group session in which we were asked to speak about ourselves in regards to roles was a difficult task. To me, it seemed difficult because the subjective boundaries of not discussing such topics already existed. I believed that these boundaries existed because of the individual experiences that members of group have had in society. I thought of how my self-image at times seemed more negative while explaining it to my fellow group members. I felt that sometimes, the mood would get too negative and I felt a need to emphasize on the positive so that the focus would not just be on my role. I felt that I wanted to avoid being negative out ofShow MoreRelatedKnowing Your Audience Paper and Communication Release1083 Words   |  5 Pagestheir audience. For instance, the San Esteban Mining Company needed to know how to respond to each of the audience (families, employees, and the stakeholders) in the case of the Chilean copper mine in South America. It was on Thursday, August 5, 2010, a shaft collapsed in the Chilean copper mine trapping 33 miners 2,300 feet below ground. Immediately, a rescue mission was underway, however, another collapse in the mine stalled the efforts of the rescue crews for hours (Weik, 2010). The 33 miners remainedRead MoreKnowing Your Audience1009 Words   |  5 Pagestheir audience. For instance, the San Esteban Mining Company needed to know how to respond to each of the audience (families, employees, and the stakeholders) in the case of the Chilean copper mine in South America. It was on Thursday, A ugust 5, 2010, a shaft collapsed in the Chilean copper mine trapping 33 miners 2,300 feet below ground. Immediately a rescue mission was underway, however, another collapse in the mine stalled the efforts of the rescue crews for hours (Weik, 2010). The 33 miners remainedRead MoreEssay about Chilean Copper Mine Collapse1202 Words   |  5 PagesChilean Copper Mine Collapse BCOM/275 Disaster Strikes a Chilean Mine On August 5, 2010, employees of Minera San Esteban Primera woke up, stretched out, bathed, ate breakfast, and walked around their assuredly modest homes. They said their casual goodbyes to family as they headed off to yet another dark day at work deep in the San Jose copper mine in northern Chile. Little did they know it would be the last time for nearly two months they would see the light of day. These same blessingsRead MoreThe Collapse of the San Jose Mine: Case Study1544 Words   |  6 Pagesmine, communication from a representative with less standing would be seen as a minimization of the importance of this disaster. This is implied by the executive level of the national Chilean leadership participating in and commenting on rescue attempts, which include the President of Chile and the Minister of Mining (Reuters 2010a). Sending any speaker less than the rank of executive would imply the owner/operator took this less seriously than the national government itself. Needs of the familiesRead MoreChilean Copper Mine Collapse Essay1488 Words   |  6 PagesChilean Copper Mine Collapse Jason Terry BCOM 275 August 19, 2012 University of Phoenix Chilean Copper Mine Collapse In August 2010, the world focused on a small copper mine in northern Chile, when it was discovered that 33 trapped miners were still alive after the mining shaft collapsed. This tragedy captured audiences of every source of mainstream media around the world. The media reported updates on the conditions of the trapped miners daily until their rescue in October 2010. PeopleRead MoreCrisis Management: Disaster in Chile Essay3388 Words   |  14 Pagesthrough 2,050 feet of rock to the surface. While the mission of rescuing was completed, the Chilean government has gained enormous applauds from the world for their meticulous and systematic crisis management. Based on the Chile mine disaster, I would like to discuss some issues arising from the catastrophe in which it will be the nature of the crisis, the steps of crisis management, and the effectiveness of Chilean government on the crisis management. First of all, I would like to talk about about theRead MoreA Beautiful End of Rescue Operation2242 Words   |  9 PagesA beautiful end of Rescue Operation By:-A.K.Mishra,B.E.(Mining) In the last two decades when the world has been plagued by terrorism, violence, war, poverty, disease and natural disasters like tsunamis and earthquakes, the pictures of the amazing operation of rescue of 33 miners trapped in the copper and gold mine in Copiapo in San Hose, Chile will probably go down as this decades best loved story. Chile is a country in South America where mining for solid mineral resources take place. EarlierRead MoreA Story of Bravery: The 33 Chilean Miners1151 Words   |  5 PagesA Story of Bravery: The 33 Chilean Miners In 2010, few stories were as heart-warming as the story of the rescue of the 33 Chilean miners. These brave men, all of whom were trapped hundreds of feet below the surface in a harrowing 17-day wait game before they were found, and then another four months until they were rescued, proved to the world that there may be happy endings yet. The fantastic news coverage proved also that the world was unanimous in its support of these miners, as viewers tunedRead MoreThe Dire Situation of the Chilean Mining Incident681 Words   |  3 PagesWhen it comes to the Chilean mining incident there is definitely some considerations that we need to be aware of. For instance you need to consider just how dire the situation is for the miners as well as their family friends. Also the public wants reasons as to why the mine collapsed in the first place, during this type of situation it is vital to consider their feelings and stay calm while also showing concern in relation to what could have caused the initial incident itself. Also do not sugarcoatRead MoreLeadership Lessons From The Chilean Mine Rescue Essay1386 Words   |  6 Pagesthe Chilean Mine Rescue Leadership is a process whereby an individual influences a group of individuals to achieve a common goal (Northouse, 2016). In the article entitled Leadership lessons from the Chilean mine rescue by Rashid, Edmondson, and Leonard (2013), several leaders transcend and showed their leadership skills to surpass a challenging situation that involves several lives particularly of the miners in Chile trapped thousand of feet under the ground. The article is about the rescue mission

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Maintenance Treatment of Bipolar Disorder Essay example

Maria grew up in a small town in Ohio as an only child. She was always energetic from the time she was born and a little moody at times. Her parents thought it was normal because their son would have an attitude at times too. It was when she graduated college and started her first career. As top chief at a new restaurant in town, she was stressed to the max dealing with a full staff and managers who like telling her what she should do. At the time, she was also dealing with a messy breakup from her fiancà © of 9 months. After about 4 months of this constant stress Maria decided she was going to take a week off and let her staff run the restaurant. However, she did not show to work after her week off and no one had heard from†¦show more content†¦In Maria ’s mind, she thought she was just stressed and did not think there was a bigger problem. In the study conducted by Duffy, Alda, Hajeck, Sherry, and Grof (2010), they looked at offspring from either a control g roup (parents who were healthy) or the experimental group (one parent with Bipolar Disorder). They followed the same children over 15 years and compared their answers on a KSADS-PL interview. Within this study, they had 207 high-risk offspring, and 87 controlled offspring. Of them 60% were female participants, and they were in mid adolescents when asked to participate in the study. Their results showed that of those studied in the high-risk group (offspring of one parent with Bipolar Disorder) 67 of the 207 developed a form of Bipolar Disorder. Of the 87 offspring in the control group (neither parent had Bipolar) only one developed the disorder. Duffy et al, found that offspring who were decedents of Bipolar parents were at higher risk not only for Bipolar, but other mood disorders as well, including non-mood disorders, sleep problems, anxiety, and substance abuse. As well most of the symptoms for Bipolar and other disorders showed up earlier in those offspring of a parent wi th the disorder. They reported however, that majority of the children who were first-degree relatives would not get the Bipolar Disorder. For those children who doShow MoreRelatedSymptoms And Symptoms Of Bipolar Disorder Essay1503 Words   |  7 PagesAs typical as mood swings can be in everyday life, persistence and regularity of mood swings can reveal a mental illness. A mental illness called bipolar disorder has two types, type one and type two. This paper will be more specific to type one bipolar disorder. Type one â€Å"involves periods of severe mood episodes from mania to depression† (Colin, 2013), and it affects â€Å"more than 1% of the world’s population irrespective of nationality, ethnic origin, or socioeconomic status† (Grande et al., 2015)Read MoreThe Social Discourse Of Bipolar Disorder1643 Words   |  7 PagesThe social discourse of bipolar disorder is often punctuated by the classic manic episodes manifesting as symptoms such as distractib ility, pressured speech, decreased need for sleep, euphoric mood, grandiosity, and problems with impulse control [17]. These classic periods of high energy are often intertwined in a cyclical fashion with periods of depressive symptoms, much of the time meeting criteria for major depressive disorder, as well as periods with no symptoms [17]. The frequency by which aRead MoreLithium in the Treatment of Bipolar I Disorder1815 Words   |  7 Pagesthe mania and depression of Bipolar I. However, due to the high incidence of inadequate preventive response, as well as a host of undesirable side effects and a narrow therapeutic index, health care providers have sought other mood stabilizing medications for either monotherapy or use with Lithium. One such medication is Carbamazepine, used either in monotherapy or in combination with other medications. While pharmacotherapy is classically used to treat Bipolar I Disorder, health care providers areRead MoreManic Depression And The Gemini Dis order Essay1490 Words   |  6 PagesManic depression, or â€Å"The Gemini disorder† is most commonly known as Bipolar Disorder. This illness is a brain disorder, which causes abrupt and unusual mood shifts. These irritable mood shifts can be related to the individual’s energy, activity levels, or their ability to carry out daily tasks. This disorder goes beyond the ordinary mood swings we all are aware of. Manic depression has three forms that are characterized as periods of acute elevation of elatedness, or irritability. More often thanRead MoreSymptoms And Symptoms Of Bipolar Essay1545 Words   |  7 Pagescharacteristics of bipolar I disorder with psychotic symptoms. Bipolar I disorder is a mood disorder where individuals have major depressive and full manic episodes, which may include psychotic features like hallucinations or delusions (Comer, 2014). People with bipolar I disorder display, during their manic state which typically lasts at least a week, exhibit i rritable, angry or abnormally high moods (Comer, 2014). In the particular case of EM, his behaviors seem to correlate with bipolar I mood disorder withRead MoreSymptoms And Treatment Of Bipolar Disorder1220 Words   |  5 PagesThe history of bipolar disorder is perhaps just as complex as the condition itself. Bipolar is highly recognized as a treatable disorder. The more we learn about bipolar disorder, the more people may be able to receive the help that they need. Centuries passed and little new was discovered about bipolar disorder until French psychiatrist Jean-Pierre Falret published an article in 1851 describing what he called â€Å"la folie circulaire,† which translates to circular insanity. The article details peopleRead MoreMechanisms Addiction Reviews The Strong Relationship Between Bipolar And Substance Use Disorders1280 Words   |  6 Pagesrelationship between bipolar and substance-use disorder Mechanisms and treatment implications Bipolar disorder and substance-use disorders commonly occur in the same individual. In fact, bipolar disorder has a higher prevalence of substance-use disorders than any other psychiatric illness. Individuals with both disorders have a more severe course of bipolar disorder, including earlier onset, more frequent episodes, and more complications, including anxiety- and stress-related disorders, aggressive behaviorRead MoreSymptoms And Treatment Of Bipolar Disorder1572 Words   |  7 Pages Introduction Bipolar disorder has had a large history full of misunderstandings, wrongful treatments and stigma surrounding the illness. Bipolar, formerly called manic depression causes extreme mood swings that include emotional highs (mania) and lows (depression). (Mayo 1998) When you become depressed you may feel sad, vulnerable and anxious. When you experience mania you will become overly joyful or full of energy, making the crash back to depression that much harder. According to A ShortRead MoreBipolar Disorder And Mental Health755 Words   |  4 PagesBipolar disorder has become more prevalent in the United States, particularly Bipolar Disorder II, which accounts for 30-50% of patients with depression (Thomas Hersen, 2002). Historically bipolar was known as manic depression (Thomas Hersen, 2002). According to National Institute of Mental Health (n. d.) â€Å"Most scientists agree that there is no single cause, rather many factors that act together to produce the illness or increase the risk† (NIMH, n. d.) Some of those factors can be family, workplaceRead MoreBipolar Disorder : Symptoms And Treatment854 Words   |  4 Pagesmedical condition known as bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder is when a person suffers from severe shifts in mood and energy. In most cases, bipolar disorder can be treated and people with the illness can live normal and productive lives with the help of medication and or therapy. Aiken, C. (2010). Family Experiences of Bipolar Disorder: The Ups, the Downs and the Bits in Between. Retrieved from Ebsco Host. In this book the author discusses her own dealings with Bipolar Disorder. She goes on to say how

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Social Media Has a Negative Effect on Body Image and Self Esteem Essay Example For Students

Social Media Has a Negative Effect on Body Image and Self Esteem Essay Social media has become one of the most popular sources of communication for the upcoming generation. For young people growing up in today’s society, social media outlets such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter have provided pictures and news that have become the first thing that their eyes see in the morning and the last thing that they see before bed. These pictures have provided unrealistic standards as to what is considered beautiful in today’s society. As young people refer to these images as a form of comparison, it has created harmful circumstances. These influences on the lives of young people have forced them to take extreme measures and in some cases, has been the cause of death. Social media in today’s society has proven to have a negative impact on the way young people, specifically females, view their bodies. Unrealistic beauty standards, dangerous comparisons and disorders have all been a result to the increase in social media and the impact that it has on the lives of young people. To begin, social media has created unrealistic standards for young people, especially females. Being bombarded by pictures of females wearing bikinis or minimal clothing that exemplifies their â€Å"perfect† bodies, squatting an unimaginable amount of weight at a gym while being gawked at by the opposite sex or of supermodels posing with some of life’s most desirable things has created a standard that many young people feel they need to live up to. If this standard isn’t reached, then it is assumed that they themselves are not living up to the norms or the â€Å"standards† and then therefore, they are not beautiful. The article Culture, Beauty and Therapeutic Alliance discusses the way in which females are bombarded with media messages starting at a young age. On page 81 of this article, Carneiro et.al (2013) states that the idealized women in today’s society are â€Å" white, slim, helpless, young, feminine, and submissive.† (p. 81) These st andards are clearly represented in social media. From accounts on Instagram that encourage things such as thigh gaps, unhealthy fitness standards and sexual encounters, it’s engrained in the brains of young people that they must look like this in order to be successful and desired. This article also discusses the way negative standards are represented through things such as Barbie Dolls, which surrounds young females with unrealistic expectations and creates and idealized standard that is in fact, not ideal. (Carniero, 2013, p. 82) From the standards that are created through today’s social media, it has created it a new subculture and for some people, a new way of life. Due to the increase in popularity of social media, today’s generation is bombarded with unrealistic standards when it comes to beauty. When young people today first turn on their cellphones, more often than not, they refer to a social media site. Whether it’s the ever-popular Instagram, where people can post pictures and followers can â€Å"like† to show their approval or post comments. Or, whether it’s Twitter, where people can post witty or inspiring or informational things for their followers to see and can be retweeted or favourited. Or they could click on the little blue Facebook icon, where all of the above can happen. These are some of the most popular social media outlets today because young people are greeted with instant gratification. From likes, to favourites to retweets, all of these things symbolize power, authority in some cases and the most important to young people today, approval. This need and desire to be â€Å"wanted† by their p eers in an online and superficial way has created a new and separate subculture when it comes to young people. In the article Women’s Exposure to thin- and-beautiful Media Images: Body image effects of media ideal internalization and impact reduction inventions (2005), the authors, Yamamiya et al. state that the average women feels the need to be an increasingly smaller size than in previous years. (p.74) This proves that people, especially young women, in today’s society have created a new ideal when it comes to the way beauty is viewed- and the increase in social media could definitely be thanked for this. This article written by Yamamiya et al. (2005) also presents some alarming statistics, such that â€Å"even a 5 min exposure to thin-and-beautiful media images results in a more negative body image state than does exposure to images of neutral objects, particularly among young women with high media-ideal internalization levels and social comparison tendencies.â₠¬  (Yamamiya et al. , 2005, p.78) These statistics prove that all the negative exposure of the female (and male) body on social media outlets really does have a detrimental effect on the lives of young people. By being constantly exposed to these images and messages, it has created dangerous and sometimes life altering consequences. .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 , .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 .postImageUrl , .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 , .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284:hover , .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284:visited , .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284:active { border:0!important; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284:active , .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284 .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .uafd78f63fcbbf52946d19d82084e8284:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Essay on The Impact of Social Media Upon RelationshipsAs presented, social media clearly has had a negative impact on the way young people view their bodies. Due to these standards and the pressure placed on young people to look a certain way, it has caused many people to resort to extreme measures such as extreme yoyo dieting, eating disorders and in some cases, plastic surgery. These are obviously very extreme, and in some cases, deadly. Eating disorders such as bulimia nervosa and anorexia have both become prevalent disorders in today’s society. It seems as if wherever anyone goes, stories of people who endure these disorders on a daily basis are discussed. Accor ding to Derenne and Beresin’s article Body image, media, and eating disorders, they state that eating disorders, such as the ones mentioned above have been coming into the forefront more recently due to the increases in the access to media and more specifically, social media. This article also discusses the dramatic increases that are taking place right now when it comes to the statistics of people who claim to have or have had any of the aforementioned disorders. (Derenne Bersesin, 2006, p. 256) The increase in these statistics is obviously not a healthy thing for young people or for society as a whole. This increase also is a key factor in the creation of a new subculture, as mentioned above. This is because as people start to use unhealthy methods to achieve bodies that are not â€Å"average†, it creates a new norm. And because of this new norm, other people who see these images that are posted on social media outlets, such as Instagram, Facebook and Twitter and tr y to alter their bodies to imitate what they see. This is a vicious cycle that often results in people resorting to unhealthy methods, such as dieting and in extreme cases, eating disorders such as bulimia nervosa, anorexia and binge eating. Overall, through the examination and analysis of these particular articles, it is clear that social media in today’s society has proven to have a negative effect on the way young people, specifically females, view their bodies. Social media outlets such as Instagram, which displays pictures that are posted by people who in return, expect â€Å"likes†. Twitter, which allows people to post up to 140 characters to express how they’re feeling or what’s on their mind and Facebook, which is a mix of the two of the aforementioned have had a major impact on the live of young people. These social networking sites have created unrealistic beauty standards as things such as Photoshop and filters flow through the cyber sphere. These beauty standards have created new norms as to what the â€Å"average† person ought to look like. Due to these unrealistic standards presented, young people (especially females) have resorted to dangerous methods to achieve the †Å"perfect body† which in some cases have been life threatening. Overall, it is most definitely clear that the media and in this case, social media has a large effect on the way people live their lives. Carneiro, R., Zeytinoglu, S., Hort, F., Wilkins, E. (2013). Culture, beauty, and therapeutic alliance. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 25(2), 80-92. Derenne, J. L., Beresin, E. V. (2006). Body image, media, and eating disorders. Academic Psychiatry, 30(3), 257-261. Yamamiya, Y., Cash, T. F., Melnyk, S. E., Posavac, H. D., Posavac, S. S. (2005). Womens exposure to thin-and-beautiful media images: Body image effects of media-ideal internalization and impact-reduction interventions. Body image, 2(1), 74-80. Works Cited Carneiro, R., Zeytinoglu, S., Hort, F., Wilkins, E. (2013). Culture, beauty, and therapeutic alliance. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 25(2), 80-92. Derenne, J. L., Beresin, E. V. (2006). Body image, media, and eating disorders. Academic Psychiatry, 30(3), 257-261. .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d , .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d .postImageUrl , .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d , .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d:hover , .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d:visited , .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d:active { border:0!important; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d:active , .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u6b73e45ce360d2a5e41ef79d56d0eb0d:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Media Can Mold the Way Adolescents Think EssayYamamiya, Y., Cash, T. F., Melnyk, S. E., Posavac, H. D., Posavac, S. S. (2005). Womens exposure to thin-and-beautiful media images: Body image effects of media-ideal internalization and impact-reduction interventions. Body image, 2(1), 74-80.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Argument Analysis Essay 2

Argument Analysis Essay 2 Argument Analysis Essay 2 Bryant & Stratton College Buffalo Campus PHIL 310: Logic and Reasoning Winter 2015 W 6:20pm-9:00pm Brandon Rudroff Argument Analysis Essay 2 PHIL 310 Course Outcomes Assessed 2. Relate the importance of basic logical concepts such as validity, soundness and consistency to reasoning practice. 3. Apply analytical and thinking skills through syllogistic, symbolic and informal logic scenarios. 5. Translate, formalize and evaluate simple arguments in categorical and propositional form. 6. Combine theory and practice to communicate logical arguments orally and in written form. 7. Construct and defend arguments for ones’ self. 8. Critically assess the argument of others. For this final essay, you will provide a critical analysis of the inherent value of logic and reasoning (for life) as well as its contributory (utility) value for your own specific expected career, future educational interests, or life interests. To help support your findings, make connections to topics discussed in class, use references from the textbook, and locate research from reliable sources to help validate and enhance your perspective. To provide some structure to your completion of the assignment, please follow these directions: Introductory Paragraph: Introduce the reader to the paper topic and include a sentence or more that summarizes your main point (thesis) that you will defend in the paper. While this assignment is reflective in nature, it should still have a clear position that you will defend. Body paragraphs: Be sure to address the following: Describe the roles of your expected career, future educational interests, or life interests. Explore the underlying reasons for these decisions. Use logical and reasoning concepts discussed in class this term and reference these concepts from the textbook and class notes. Explore the value of logic and reasoning in relationship to fulfilling these roles in your expected career, future educational interests, or life interests. To help support your ideas, make connections to topics discussed in class, use references from the textbook, and locate research from reliable sources to help validate and enhance your perspective. Explore the value of logic and reasoning in relationship to the happy life in general. To help support your ideas, make connections to topics discussed in class, use references from the textbook, and locate research from reliable sources to help validate and enhance your perspective. You

Sunday, February 23, 2020

The Philosophical Foundations of the American Criminal Justice System Research Paper

The Philosophical Foundations of the American Criminal Justice System - Research Paper Example Some years after the independence before the alteration of its constitution, the courts were using a replica of the Great Britain courts. One reason that prompted a change in the constitution was that the British law did not offer equal justice and was favoring the English. Among the amendments that were made in the constitution was provision of due process that still exists in current U.S constitution that suspect possesses the right to be informed of accusations brought against him before appearing on the court and prepare for appropriate defense. The American police are responsible in the attainment of goals of the American criminal justice. They do this by arresting crime suspects, investigating crime, as well as facilitating correction. The American law enforcement is no exception of what America inherited from the Great Britain. Retribution is a method of punishment. Correction aims at reforming criminals and reshaping them to fit in the society. Yet again, it is important to remember that The American criminal Justice System borrows heavily from the Great Britain this notion of correction. Rehabilitation can be discussed under correction; however, it is far much better and humane form of punishment. As opposed to correction, which is a vindictive approach to crime, rehabilitation seeks to help convicted criminals to conform, embrace good moral behavior, and become useful members of the society. While The American criminal Justice has aims and principles that govern its operations, it is also founded on a philosophy.